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How LinkedIn Learning builds skills for academic success

By Lesa Bressanelli, OIT Communications intern

As the original buzz of excitement from move-in and orientation is replaced by growing whirlwinds of questions, like how can I effectively manage my time, what’s the best way to take notes, how do I get enough sleep? LinkedIn Learning has your back.

With a global library offering more than three thousand courses in the areas of business, technology and creativity in six different languages, there is something for everyone. 

Duke has offered LinkedIn Learning for free to students since 2016 after Lynda.com, Duke’s online training partner, was acquired by the educational platform. Since then, LinkedIn Learning has helped Duke students to stay ahead inside and outside of the classroom.

“Any topic that you think of, we probably have content related to it. LinkedIn Learning is a great resource for learning more about what you’re interested in,” said Elma Clarke, a customer success manager for LinkedIn Learning who works closely with Duke.

As the academic year resumes, Clarke shares what all students can gain from using LinkedIn Learning.

 

How can LinkedIn Learning help me with class?

There’s content that students can leverage to supplement what they’re learning in the classroom. Students will sometimes start at LinkedIn Learning as a supplemental resource. It’s like going to the library to read something, except it’s just a virtual library.

 

Do I really have to sit and watch the WHOLE video?

Our content doesn’t need to be consumed all at once. You don’t need to watch a course in its entirety as our content is designed to be flexible. Students will find it helpful to go to a course and then be able to return to it later because the courses are broken down into mini videos that you are able to parse through to get what you need.

 

What other kinds of skills can I learn?

You can find videos on how to manage your personal finances, such as how to budget. There is also a lot of well-being content. Students may find content around techniques for mindfulness, handling stress and ergonomics helpful. This has been especially true during exams, as there is an increase in students watching that type of content while dealing with stress.

Learn more about how to manage your money with “Managing Your Personal Finances.” Learn more about mindfulness and ways to deal with stress through the LinkedIn Learning audio course “Mindfulness for Beginners” or the series “Supporting Your Well-Being during Times of Change and Uncertainty.”

 

How can LinkedIn Learning help me with finding internships or jobs?

There is a lot of content related to career planning, career development, resume writing, how to find a job, how to negotiate your salary or job hunting skills.

When it comes to skill-building, though, there are skills referred to as foundational skills, or ‘soft skills,’ that are in demand by employers, but aren’t tied to a particular degree, such as how to work with a virtual team, how to be a great team player, how to manage your time, and much more. These skills are commonly gained in the workplace, but with the world changing so fast, it’s helpful for students who are graduating to already have these skill sets.

Students who use LinkedIn Learning are more employable, with a 39% higher employment rate on average for LinkedIn student learners globally. Ultimately, the reason students are at university is to gain skills. LinkedIn Learning is a part of the university’s solution to help and empower students.

Still trying to figure out where you want to go post-graduation? Check out “Defining and Achieving Professional Goals” and “Planning Your Career and Your Life.”

 

This is so overwhelming, where do I start?

In figuring out what you should be watching, ask yourself: What do you feel you’re lacking? What is the thing that you know you need the most help with? Where is your head at? Do you feel like you’re not prepared to do certain things by yourself? And I would probably say, ‘go to LinkedIn Learning to get the answer.’ If there’s a skill you want to learn, there’s a course that covers it. A lot of students tend to look up videos on organizational skills, study skills and time management.

For tips on getting better with organization, check out “How to Organize Your Time and Your Life”; for tips on getting better with studying, check out “Learning Study Skills;” and for tips on getting better with time management, check out “Time Management Fundamentals.”


Get started exploring LinkedIn Learning.

Still need a little more guidance? Access LinkedIn Learning from your LinkedIn account, or get started on the OIT website.